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Handwriting vs. Typing: Teaching Cursive in Schools

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Handwriting vs. Typing: Teaching Cursive in Schools

Kendall Snyder, Author

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Since technology has advanced over the last couple of decades, certain traditions and forms of communication have quickly become antiquated. A specific example of this is cursive handwriting: an art that was once a required course for students. Though many schools have stopped teaching this skill, there is still a debate over whether or not that was the right decision. 

People who are for teaching cursive believe that it promotes creativity. Many supporters use the fact that the Constitution is written in cursive to support their argument. Learning cursive also encourages students to work on their spelling, as they must concentrate more on which letters they are using as they learn a different form of handwriting than they are used to. It has even been shown that using cursive may improve students SAT scores. 

“I think that it should be taught because I believe it is important. It helps to diversify students writing,” said senior Marissa Robinson. 

On the other hand, because everyone is using technology all of the time, spellcheck makes memorizing spelling less necessary than it has been in the past. Additionally, the Constitution may have been originally written in cursive, but it has since been transcribed into print, allowing students who don’t know cursive to read the document. 

“I don’t really think it should be taught in school because it isn’t really necessary anymore. You only really need to know it for your signature, and, even then, you don’t need to know the whole alphabet for that,” said junior Jillian Bowman. 

People on this side of the argument agree with Bowman, believing that cursive writing is unnecessary and that teaching it would be wasting time when more modern subjects, like computer skills, could be taught in its place. 

Because we are constantly surrounded by technology, however, it would be pleasant for students to take the time to learn something that isn’t being exposed to them as frequently as the internet. 

Though it may not be essential, teaching students to write in cursive is still a useful skill for them to learn. It promotes creativity, teaches students to see words in a new way, and pulls them away from the computer for a while, which, in this digital age, isn’t a bad thing. 

About the Contributor
Kendall Snyder, Author

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Handwriting vs. Typing: Teaching Cursive in Schools